Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.

This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.

This is hands down the best Paleo recipe guide you can get for the money, and there isn’t even a close second. It has over 350 recipes that show you how to cook with all of the wholesome foods you should be eating, and deftly avoids all of the junk that mucks up your system and makes you sluggish and fat. It’s laid out in such a manner that you can clearly see what you’ll need, and how to make it. There’s even an 8 week autopilot meal plan that takes out all of the guesswork to make this caveman simple to follow.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
A very hot oven quickly roasts the potatoes and finishes the chicken without overcooking. The simple oil mixture, using solely extra-virgin olive oil to keep it paleo-friendly, packs a ton of flavor without adding excessive calories or fat to an already flavorful dinner. To serve a family, double the recipe and use an additional sheet pan for added space. You can substitute fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise, for the small Yukon gold potatoes.

This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
Spiralized sweet potatoes make for a hearty pasta replacement in this fresh feeling paleo meal. Puttanesca is an ultra-savory Italian pasta dish that typically consists of capers, anchovies, olives, tomatoes, garlic, and olive oil. In this iteration, fresh tomatoes meet their salty match for a hearty, dairy-free pasta dish that's light on calories and heavy on flavor. For a vegetarian option, leave out the anchovies and use vegetable broth instead of chicken.
This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.

The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
Hey, great recipe and site!! FYI, The Paleo Kitchen cookbook has a mayo recipe that is SOOOO much easier…you take 3/4 cut oil of your choice, 1 egg, lemon juice(1 tsp I think), and 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, place them in a tall, narrow container, and use an immersion blender! Start at the bottom and move the blender upward as the ingredients emulsify. I had quit making my own mayo because the other way was SO time consuming and mine never seemed to come out right, but this version is pretty fool-proof! I use grapeseed oil because the olive oil is a bit bitter for me.

Practical Paleo is more than just a recipe book. Instead, the book acts as a particularly effective introduction to the paleo diet, offering information and steps about what you can expect from the beginning all the way through. Some of this information may even be new to people who have been following paleo for a while, especially as there is a discussion about gut bacteria and various ways to live a paleo lifestyle effectively.
This book is particularly geared towards entertaining friends and family with stunning Paleo meals that they might not even know are Paleo. The typical problem presents itself that you want to entertain, but you don’t want to sacrifice your progress by eating a bunch of foods that aren’t Paleo friendly. The answer is to cater your own Paleo approved foods, and this recipe guide shows you how to make foods that everyone will enjoy, regardless of whether or not they share your Paleo philosophy. It has everything from a full dinner party to just a casual get together. Become a master Paleo host with this guide.
×