A true labor of love, "Mediterranean Paleo Cooking" is a collaborative effort from nutritionist Caitlin Weeks and her Algerian chef husband, Nabil Boumrar. Together, they explore the flavors of Boumrar's native North Africa, offering an array of gluten-free, Paleo-friendly recipes such as cinnamon-braised beef, almond meatball soup and spicy chicken tagine. Staples like falafel, moussaka, hummus and pita bread are also included, along with multicourse menu plans — providing home cooks with the necessary tools for a Mediterranean-themed dinner party.

Most commercial goods will be off limits while you’re on the Paleo diet because they are filled with processed ingredients, grains, chemicals, and other foods that just aren’t able to make the cut while eating the Paleo way. These spiced scones do a good job of replacing the pumpkin spiced scones you find at your local Starbucks when the season is right. The trick is they don’t use any ingredients that aren’t on the Paleo list of approved foods, so you’re totally in the clear. Isn’t it great that Paleo minded chefs are hard at work to bring you guilt-free recipes like these?


Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.
Salmon tastes great and it is one of the top recommended foods you can eat while following the Paleo diet. This is because it is loaded with plenty of omega 3’s, as well as healthy fats that your body needs to function at its best. In this recipe she has made things very simple, which only serves to bring out the natural flavor of the salmon. She has it topped with slices of lemon, and also capers are used for subtle flavoring. All that’s needed is a vegetable dish to go with it to make it just right so you don’t get the munchies late at night before bedtime.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.

In the end, making a switch to the Paleo diet can ultimately turn your life around and bring you back to your natural and healthy roots. The best part about it is that it's incredibly simple. Although other diets like veganism and vegetarianism are both simple, as well, they lack the added ease of not having to count your calories or other nutrition values.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.
You’ll get over 120 recipes in this highly rated book that shows you how to cook up Paleo food for you as well as your family. If you’ve ever wanted a “diet” where you don’t have to count calories, or eat specially labeled diet foods, Paleo is the way to go and this book is the way to get started. It has information that has been peer reviewed and time tested and is sure to teach you at least something about Paleo that you didn’t know. The recipes are laid out in a manner that is easy to follow, so you’ll be sure to stick with it and learn the right way to do things.

If you love Mediterranean food as much as I do, then you need this book. The recipes are delectable, hardy, yet simple to make. Caitlin’s husband, Nabil co-wrote this book with her. He is a classically trained chef and you will find his chef’s tips included all through out the book. Caitlin is a Paleo oriented holistic nutritionist. You will also find a shopping list, a healthy food buying guide and nutrition tips form her all throughout the book. Read my full review here.
Cajun seasoning is always going to do a great job of adding spice and some heat to a meal, and in this recipe they provide you with the steps to make your own Cajun seasoning mix from scratch. Be sure to make a big batch of it so you can store it and have it on hand for more Cajun style cooking in the future. Once you have the Cajun burgers in place it’s time to top them off with some caramelized onions. This is served up without a bun, and on a bed of creamed spinach, and she provides a nice creamed spinach recipe that doesn’t use any dairy, but uses coconut milk instead.
Regardless of the origin of the name, the caveman diet has many of the same principles as the paleo diet. It’s focused primarily on the consumption of higher quantities of real, unprocessed, non-packaged food that cavemen could have eaten thousands of years ago, before Safeway, Walmart, and all of the other mega-super-duper-grocery stores we have available in today’s world came into being. Here are the basics:
Everybody gets their own mini personal pizza when you cook up these squash pizzas. Each slice of squash becomes a tiny sized pizza that is loaded up with Paleo friendly toppings. It’s a great way to use up that butternut squash you bought, and simply requires that you top them up with items that you like. They’re recommending meats and veggies so you can keep it Paleo, and really as long as you stick with those two types of foods you’ll be doing just fine.
We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 
A paleo diet promotes high-protein recipes with responsibly raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats and poultry, and wild-caught, sustainably sourced seafood. Good fat comes in as a close second, with sources like nuts, seeds, coconut oil, avocado oil, and extra virgin olive oil as excellent choices. Vegetables are also key, as long as they're not too starchy. Avoid white potatoes, but most fresh veggies are fair game.
This recipe gives you dinner party elegance in a 20-minute dish. We rely on sea bass, a tender, mild-flavored fish with a lovely buttery quality. There are several sustainable options to choose from (Atlantic black sea bass, for one), so ask questions at the fish counter to ensure you're making a responsible choice. You can also use cod, sablefish (also called black cod), striped bass, or barramundi with great results.

This recipe actually inspired my big project, Bravo For Vive, a line of Paleo foods for concessions. I thought these wraps would be awesome for tailgating and stadium food, and I wanted to be able to help those who want to eat healthy but have no option to in these situations! This season we will be at LSU, and we could be coming to a stadium near you soon! You can see my cute promo video about our concession line on Youtube. 
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
At some point on the Paleo diet you’re going to crave something sweet, flavorful, and crunchy, and that’s when we’d recommend baking up a batch of these clusters. They use pumpkin seeds, and we’re just finding out how healthy these are, and the benefits they provide. The sweetness comes from coconut sugar and honey, two approved sources of sweet on Paleo. We recommend going with organic raw honey to avoid the processed kind you find on store shelves. The other ingredients are all-natural, just be sure to use organic pumpkin seeds for the best results.
The Summer Eats collection of recipes is unlike anything we’ve seen in the world of Paleo. These are like gourmet meals done in Paleo fashion, so you’ll feel like you’re getting well-fed, but keeping healthy at the same time. She’s gone for quality over quantity, so you won’t be inundated with hundreds of recipes, and in fact she’s providing just 16 recipes designed to knock your socks off. This is the type of recipe collection you’ll want to have on hand when you want a special meal, but don’t want to veer off your Paleo plan. She also provides recipes for clean cocktails, so you can enjoy a tasty beverage without packing on the calories and sugar.
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